Enhanced Experience

Enhanced Experience

Art is a powerful tool to make riders’ experience in transit more enjoyable and less stressful. Aesthetic enhancements attract riders, enhance civic pride, create a connection with place, and provide a sense of community identity and vibrancy.

IMPROVED PUBLIC TRANSIT EXPERIENCE
Art is a powerful tool to make riders’ experience in transit more enjoyable and less stressful. Aesthetic enhancements attract riders, enhance civic pride, create a connection with place, and provide a sense of community identity and vibrancy. Additional benefits include increased safety and easier navigation.

ART ENHANCES RIDER SATISFACTION
Studies of the art-in-transit programs in Buenos Aires, Naples, Vancouver, and New York reveal that artistically enhanced transit environments make people more likely to take transit,1 2 3 and that people are willing to pay more, endure longer wait times, and travel farther to access aesthetically enhanced transit lines or stations.4 Further studies show that passenger complaints of walking distances or waiting times in transit environments (including airports and train stations) dropped in areas where artwork was present.5

ART DECREASES STRESS AND IMPROVES WAYFINDING
An aesthetically pleasing environment puts riders at ease. Art decreases riders’ feelings of stress brought on by commuting, and can also assist riders in navigating confusing, often unfamiliar subterranean territory.6

ART INCREASES PUBLIC SAFETY
Art in the transit corridor has been proven to deter vandalism, increase feelings of safety, and decrease crime.7 By bringing vibrancy to a public space, art can improve the appearance and safety of the transit facility.8

ART CREATES A SENSE OF PLACE AND INCREASES COMMUNITY PRIDE
Public art defines a sense of place, and can transform transit stations into cultural landmarks and dynamic destinations that have meaning and resonance for residents and visitors.9 10 A three-year study of 26 cities in the US consistently found aesthetics to be among the three most important factors determining a person’s passion for his or her community.11 Art, therefore, enhances community pride. Through art integration, the station environment can become a space to reveal and celebrate a community’s uniqueness—empowering residents, educating visitors, and inviting people to explore the community.12 13 14 15 Engaging local artists and community members in the integration of art into the station environment can increase cross-cultural respect, community cohesion, and local investment.16 17 18

ART CREATES A POSITIVE, PERSONAL CONNECTION WITH TRANSIT
Art resonates on a personal level that connects riders to the stations. Research conducted in the New York City Transit system shows that despite significant demographic differences, regular commuters feel a tremendous connection to the permanent artworks at their stations, feel strongly that art improves their overall commute, and would like to see even more artwork in transit systems. Artistically enhanced stations make riders feel welcomed, inspired, and safer, and they in turn respond with greater respect for the transit environment and improved feelings toward the service provider.19 20

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Citations

1 Federation of Canadian Municipalities. Urban Environmental Programs, Case Studies in Sustainable Transportation, North America Case Study 95: Public Art and Design in Transit, November 2011. https://www.fcm.ca/Documents/case-studies/GMF/Transport-Canada/PublicArtDesignTransit_EN.pdf

2 Transit Cooperative Research Program, sponsored by the Federal Transit Administration. Research Results Digest 96. August 2010. http://onlinepubs.trb.org/onlinepubs/tcrp/tcrp_rrd_96.pdf

3 Seixas, Naomi. “Does Art matter? Assessing the Social Value of Public Art in New York City’s Transit System.” Tracing the City: Interventions of Art and Public Space. Adapted for ‘Urban Encounters: Art and the Public’ from a demonstration of professional competence submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science and Regional Planning, School of Architecture, Pratt Institute. May 2013. http://tracingthecity.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Does-Art-Matter.pdf

4 Cascetta, Ennio and Armando Carteni. The hedonic value of railway terminals. A quantitative analysis of the impact of stations quality on traveler’s behavior. 2012. Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering, University of Napoli Frederico II, Naples, Italy.

5 UITP. Fact Sheet: Art on Transport. March 2003.

6 American Public Transportation Association (APTA). Recommended Practice: Best Practices for Integrating Art into Capital Projects. APTA Standards Development Program, APTA SUDS-UD-RP-007-13. Published June 28, 2013. http://www.apta.com/resources/hottopics/sustainability/Documents/APTA%20SUDS-UD-RP-007-13%20Integrating%20Art%20into%20Capital%20Projects.pdf

7 American Public Transportation Association. Recommended Practice: Best Practices for Integrating Art into Capital Projects. APTA SUDS-UD-RP-007-13.

8 U.S. Federal Transportation Administration Circular 9400.1A. “Design and Art in Transit Projects.” 1995

9 Abramson, Cynthia. Art and the Transit Experience. Places Journal, July 1994.

10 Village Well. Train Stations as Places for Community Wellbeing. Published by Village Well (Victoria, Australia). July 2006.

11 The Soul of the Community (2011). Gallup survey funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation

12 Americans for the Arts. Why Public Art Matters. Public Art Network Council, Green Paper. http://blog.artsusa.org/artsblog/wp-content/uploads/greenpapers/documents/PublicArtNetwork_GreenPaper.pdf

13 American Public Transportation Association (APTA). Recommended Practice: Best Practices for Integrating Art into Capital Projects. APTA Standards Development Program, APTA SUDS-UD-RP-007-13. Published June 28, 2013. http://www.apta.com/resources/hottopics/sustainability/Documents/APTA%20SUDS-UD-RP-007-13%20Integrating%20Art%20into%20Capital%20Projects.pdf

14 Loukaitou-Sideris, Anastasia and James Rojas. Project for Public Spaces (project funded by FTA). Tools for Transit Dependent Communities http://www.pps.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Tools-for-Transit-Dependent-Communities.pdf

15 Rapson, Rip. Creative placemaking: Rethinking the role of arts and culture in strengthening communities. CEO of Kresge Foundation, Speaking at the League of Historic American Theaters conference. July 18, 2013 http://kresge.org/about-us/presidents-corner/creative-placemaking-rethinking-role-arts-and-culture-strengthening-commu

16 Mackie, Jack. Public Art and Placemaking. Public Art Review. September 24, 2013. http://forecastpublicart.org/public-art-review/2013/09/public-art-placemaking/

17 Rapson, Rip. Creative placemaking: Rethinking the role of arts and culture in strengthening communities. CEO of Kresge Foundation, Speaking at the League of Historic American Theaters conference. July 18, 2013. http://kresge.org/about-us/presidents-corner/creative-placemaking-rethinking-role-arts-and-culture-strengthening-commu

18 Village Well. Train Stations as Places for Community Wellbeing. Published by Village Well (Victoria, Australia). July 2006. http://www.vichealth.vic.gov.au/~/media/ProgramsandProjects/PlanningHealthyEnvironments/Attachments/Train_Stations_Community_Wellbeing2.ashx

19 American Public Transportation Association (APTA). Recommended Practice: Best Practices for Integrating Art into Capital Projects. APTA Standards Development Program, APTA SUDS-UD-RP-007-13. Published June 28, 2013. http://www.apta.com/resources/hottopics/sustainability/Documents/APTA%20SUDS-UD-RP-007-13%20Integrating%20Art%20into%20Capital%20Projects.pdf

20 U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Transit Administration (FTA). Design and Art in Transit Projects. FTA Circular 9400. 1 A. Washington D.C.: Department of Transportation Federal Transit Administration, 1995. http://www.fta.dot.gov/13094_4129.html